PRiSM Trial

Testing the Characteristics of Platelet Rich Plasma in Sports Medicine 

Thank you for considering participation in our clinical trial. Your participation will help us in our efforts to continuously improve regenerative medicine treatments.

This webpage is designed to give you an overview of the study and answer questions you may have. 

If you would like to participate in the study, you will meet with the Investigator who will provide additional information and obtain your written consent.

What is the goal of the PRiSM study?

This study evaluates patients who are receiving a PRP injection. We will determine if we can screen a patient’s PRP to predict effective treatment outcomes. ThromboLUX will be used to measure the constituents in PRP preparations and this will be correlated to outcome (pain score before and after the procedure).

How does the screening work?

LightIntegra has developed an instrument called ThromboLUX to perform screening of PRP. In a toothpick-sized sample of PRP ThromboLUX determines the platelet and microparticle content using a laser.

The ThromboLUX Device will be used to test the PRP preparation and measure the constituents in the PRP.

The ThromboLUX Device will be used to test the PRP preparation and measure the constituents in the PRP.

How does the study work?

Each patient’s residual PRP sample will be tested on ThromboLUX. Testing will not alter the standard of care. You will receive the same treatment with or without PRP testing. The results of your pain scores will be compared to ThromboLUX analysis.

What is PRP?

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is produced from a person’s autologous (own blood) donation. PRP contains blood plasma, blood cells known as platelets, and also may contain microparticles. Platelets circulate through the blood and are critical for blood clotting and are essential for healing. Microparticles are small fragments of blood cells.

How is PRP collected?

Whole blood is stored in a tube and centrifuged to separate the PRP from the red cells.

Whole blood is stored in a tube and centrifuged to separate the PRP from the red cells.

A blood sample is drawn from the patient and put into a centrifuge, which is a tool that separates the blood into components. PRP can then be separated.

Why receive a PRP injection?

Some early-stage clinical and research studies have shown promising results when PRP is used for a variety of conditions, including treating acute and chronic tendon issues, as well as injuries to ligaments and muscles. Overall, there is limited support of PRP injections in published literature. More investigative work is required to prove the effectiveness of PRP injections and determine the best ways to standardize the preparation. PRP is autologous, and is considered a low-risk treatment with the potential to improve or speed healing.

How is PRP used?

PRP is given to patients as a direct injection into an injury site.

Will there be extra tests if I participate?

No, there will be no extra tests.

Will I have to do anything else?

You will be asked to report on the intensity of pain that you have 3 and 6 weeks after your injection.

Please contact LightIntegra Technology if you have question.